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Clanbase - Game Over

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Clanbase - Game Over
For those unfamiliar with the name: ClanBase once was a cool site to visit if you were an online gamer. With cups and ladders hosted for games such as the RtCW, ET, Quake, Unreal Tournament, Counter-Strike and Call of Duty series, a teenager really had quite some options for multiplayer entertainment. Heck, we even had LAN finals for our renowned EuroCups.

Those days are far behind us and as it stands today, the company that owns the ClanBase site - GGL - is unable to cover the costs required to run the website. Moreover, lately the owners of the site do not wish to cooperate with the voluntary crew, keeping everybody in the dark and thus showing complete disrespect to people who spend many hours a day trying to make our tournaments a success.

The website has now been offline for more than three weeks due to an unpaid bill. No action is being taken by the owner to get the website back online. Having no vision for the future, we - the ClanBase Crew - have lost our last hopes about ClanBase ever coming back online, and unfortunately we announce the end of a great era.

The history and the truth as the ClanBase Crew sees it

A US-based company called Global Gaming League (Professional Interactive Entertainment, Inc.) noticed the success of the site and bought it from the original owners in December of 2004. They had financial backing for server hosting and our tournaments. Things were going well until in 2007 CB suffered its first heart attack when GGL couldn’t deliver the prize money they put up for the EuroCup. This can be marked as the start of our downfall.

The CB Crew has always been made up of volunteers with the majority being just teenagers. There was no possibility for us to come up with the money on our own that was promised, yet we were always the ones getting blamed. After all, it was our cup season and our name. It is no surprise that after this blow there was no way for us to host another season with the promise of any kind of prize until the debt was settled with the previous winners.

To this day, GGL owes around €24,000 in prize money which will never be settled. The other sites who were in the same gaming business of course had no problems hosting their tournaments however they wanted. ClanBase, however, lost a great deal of its reputation along with some top teams who never got their winnings.

As time went by the site also started to decay. After the takeover we had paid developers who tried to put the code in shape. There were some noteworthy developments such as the seasonal and invitational ladders, but after the first test run we couldn’t get the necessary changes implemented - because GGL stopped paying the developers.

Money. The source of all evil.

GGL started moving the servers between hosts (RackSpace, Amazon, GreenQloud) to save costs, and to avoid further missed payments. This appeared in the news a few times when providers came out with how they were lied to. We also lost the ability to upload files anything other than demos. Fortunately, a Crew member had the means to help out.

Funding continued to dry up. After the first wave of cuts where we lost the two developers and a head admin, things cooled down for a while. Recently, a general system administrator was cut off which got interesting at one point when CB suffered a denial of service attack to which the host (GreenQloud) responded with moving the servers to a different IP address. However, the domain name had to be updated as well to point to the new address. Since our sysadmin was not getting paid, he refused to perform this, essentially holding the site hostage for a while.

So how do we get money? The site had ads for a while which obviously was not enough. We may have been naive thinking that upping the quality of the site would be a good move, which was promised more times we bother to count. GGL thought otherwise. In fact, many of the cool features our gamers would have loved to see on the website were never implemented - because "CBv2” was supposedly just around the corner.

Their first bold move was trying to get adult banners on CB - a website that was home for thousands of teenagers. The Crew was shocked and appalled by this. Fortunately, we managed to get our voice through (by threatening to go on strike) - but we also lost several valuable crew members who had enough of the poor conditions and bad decisionmaking.

Next to adult material, gambling can also be a good source of income. The Poker and Betting ladders were introduced. It is doubtful that much money was ever made of this, at least nobody said otherwise. The only thing certain is that these projects never got off the ground.

A poor attempt was also made to gather money in the form of offering VIP membership. Nobody took this very seriously and as expected, nobody bothered to opt in after a while. The only benefit to having VIP was the ability to get rid of some of the ads. Perhaps a regular donation system would’ve been more useful.

By the end of August 2013, yet another problem surfaced: the money ran out for the hosting. This is when CB started to go down every month when the time came to pay for the next 30 days.

Of course we tried contacting GGL through our manager who was in charge of handling communications. As you may have guessed by now, he also failed to receive his payment for a while and a company owing money to you, and who knows how many others, is not in a hurry to get back to you.

The ClanBase management tried to directly contact the GGL founder and president Ted Owen (since everyone else left), with very little success. Whenever we got a response it usually consisted of no more than a few words.

The last we heard from him, he stated that "GGL will move on without ClanBase, and besides, why did the Crew never put any money in it?”

Mr. Owen, the Crew put time in it. A lot of time... for free. Every day. And to clarify, nobody has ever reached out to us to ask for any kind of financial aid. Not that we would’ve ever agreed to anything if the money had to go through GGL as that would’ve resulted in the money never reaching its intended destination.

Ultimately, we understand that our users would have expected us to come out with the truth sooner. It has taken us three weeks to make a public statement - but the only reason it took so long is that we were trying to not lose the hope and to reach out to mr. Owen. Unfortunately, our last request (or offer) to him - to release the ClanBase site to the crew for us to be able to continue running it on our own, without the GGL - was not welcomed.

It is thus our sad duty to inform you that ClanBase is gone. We would like to sincerely thank over a thousand admins working on the website over the past 15 years of ClanBase’s existence. And an even bigger thanks goes out to all the players who supported us over the years and who did not lose faith no matter what.

This writing has not come easily because ClanBase has been a big part of our lives, and we definitely did not want to see it end like this.


Clanbase - Game Over
Die Clanbase war einmal eine sehr coole Website für Online- Gamer, mit Cups und Ligen für Spiele wie RtCW, ET, Quake, Unreal Tournament, Counter-Strike und der Call of Duty-Serie.

Diese glorreichen Tage sind nun hinter uns, und heute steht es um die Clanbase Website sehr schlecht - wir sind nicht mehr in der Lage, die erforderlichen kosten der Website zu decken.

Die Website war offline für mehr als drei Wochen, wegen einer unbezahlten Rechnung. Keine Aktion wird vom Eigentümer übernommen, um die Website wieder online zu bekommen. Da sie keine Vision für die Zukunft mehr hat. Wir - die Clanbase Crew - haben unsere letzten Hoffnungen die Clanbase jemals wieder online kommen jetzt endgültig verloren, und müssen leider das Ende einer großen Clanbase-Ära verkünden.

Source: etpro.declanbase.org

John Carmack officially leaves id Software

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John Carmack, the programmer responsible for Doom, Quake, Wolfenstein and more, has left id Software completely.

“John Carmack, who has become interested in focusing on things other than game development at id, has resigned from the studio," id's studio director Tim Willits told IGN. "John’s work on id Tech 5 and the technology for the current development work at id is complete, and his departure will not affect any current projects. We are fortunate to have a brilliant group of programmers at id who worked with John and will carry on id’s tradition of making great games with cutting-edge technology. As colleagues of John for many years, we wish him well.”

Carmack, a co-founder of id, recently joined Oculus as CTO, but remained at id Software in some capacity. "Happy to say [John Carmack] is not leaving id & will continue to provide leadership for our games in development," id publisher Bethesda stated at the time.

Oculus recently revealed it was close to solving the motion sickness problem with its Rift device, which will achieve 4K resolution sooner than expected. Earlier this year, id president Todd Hollenshead departed id as well.

Oculus was unavailable for comment.


John Carmack ist Spielern vor allem aufgrund der Erfindung von Serien wie Doom oder Quake bekannt, in letzter Zeit strebte der Entwickler jedoch anderen Projekten entgegen. Aufgrund dessen hat er nun sein Studio id Software verlassen.

John Carmack, Gründer und Technical Director bei id Software, hat das Studio verlassen, um sich in Zukunft vollkommen auf seine Arbeit als CTO bei Oculus zu konzentrieren, wie Bethesda mittlerweile offiziell bestätigte. Carmack trat im August dem Oculus-Team bei - damals hieß es noch, dass er sein Amt bei id weiter ausüben möchte.

"John Carmack, der sich mittlerweile an anderen Dingen als der Spieleentwicklung bei id interessiert zeigt, hat das Studio verlassen. Johns Arbeit an der id Tech 5-Engine und der Technologie für derzeitige Projekte bei id Software ist vollendet, weswegen sein Abgang keine aktuellen Entwicklungen beeinflussen wird. Wir sind glücklich darüber, dass wir über eine solch brilliante Gruppe an Programmierern bei id verfügen, die mit John zusammengearbeitet haben und id's Tradition, gute Spiele mit Spitzentechnologie zu entwickeln, fortführen werden. Wir wünschen ihm als langjährige Kollegen alles Gute."

John Carmack gründete id Software im Jahr 1991 und schuf damit das Fundament für die Entwicklung mehrerer bekannter Spieleserien wie Doom, Quake oder Wolfenstein. In diesem Jahr hat bereits ein anderer ranghoher Mitarbeiter des Studios das Team verlassen. Der Präsident und frühere CEO Todd Hollenshead verließ den Entwickler nach fast 17 Jahren.

Source: etpro.de | gamestar.de | ign.com

 

Media

IGN Names W:ET, RtCW and W3D in the Top 100 Shooters list

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IGN have undertaken the mammoth task of compiling the Top 100 First Person Shooters of all time from all of the shooters released in the past 20 or so years. It’s great to see Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory make the list a full decade after its release, deploying in the #84 spot.

Back in the dark age of the FPS, multiplayer was nothing but a bunch of people running in every direction at once with their triggers held down like savages. Return to Castle Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory wasn't the first game to feature objective-focused, class-based competitive play, but its free, open-sourced nature exposed a massive amount of new players to the concept, opening the door for what eventually grow into a much larger trend in multiplayer design.

 

As a reboot of the franchise that started the genre, Return to Castle Wolfenstein had a lot to live up to. And though it didn't constitute the wheel re-inventing some had hoped it would be, it was still an excellent take on the space between fighting soldiers and fighting hellspawn. In many ways it was just a natural extension of Wolfenstein 3D's controversial final boss, taking historical myths about the Nazis dabbling in the occult and swinging for the fences with them. But it would be the multiplayer that would be remembered most fondly, keeping scads of frag-heads tethered to their gaming rigs until the wee hours for months and years to come.

 

The great-granddaddy of first-person shooters, Wolfenstein 3D launched the genre we take for granted today. It was inspired by Castle Wolfenstein and its sequel, a pair of relatively crude 2D stealth shooters that pit you against Nazi guards. The metamorphosis into 3D (well, pseudo 3D) was like sorcery in 1992. Gone were the stealth elements; the golden age of run-and-gun shooters erupted with the roar of a chaingun as you blasted through three glorious episodes filled with Nazis and even Adolf Hitler himself as a boss. Id's breakout achievement directly (and indirectly) gave birth to Doom, Rise of the Triad, and every other shooter that followed.

You can check out the rest of the list over at IGN.

Source: ign.com | etpro.de | splashdamage.com

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